Urology Associates
855.901.1338
With 35 urologists, Urology Associates is the leader of urological care in Tennessee. We provide comprehensive and compassionate urological care to men and women.

Treating Recurring UTIs

Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, can happen to anyone, but when they recur, it’s important to see a urologist to pinpoint the cause and find the right UTI treatment. This video explains more about recurrent UTIs in women, who is most likely to get them, and what can be done to treat them.

Recurring UTIs may occur when the initial treatment was not effective. Typically, over-the-counter medications will not clear up an infection completely. In some cases, bladder stones can contribute to recurring UTIs as well.

Urology Associates, P.C. can help you get the right UTI treatment to put recurrent infections behind you. Make an appointment with a urologist in Nashville by calling (855) 901-1338.


Exploring the Link Between Diabetes and Kidney Stones

It is well-established that diabetes can increase the risk of kidney failure, particularly when it is poorly controlled. However, does the disease also increase the risk of kidney stones? Here is what you need to know about the connection between diabetes and kidney stones and when you should see a urologist about your symptoms.

What are kidney stones?

Kidney stones are hard, stone-like formations of excessive calcium oxalate, struvite, uric acid, or cysteine. These substances can band together inside of your kidneys and form stones that range in size from minute to large and obstructive. When stones form, they eventually must pass out of your body through your urinary tract. Small stones can pass through your system with few, if any, symptoms. Large stones can be excruciatingly painful to pass and may get stuck in your urinary tract, where they can block the release of urine and trigger infections.

How does diabetes increase the risk of kidney stones?

Diabetes can increase the acidity of your urine. If your blood glucose levels are high, the acidity in your blood increases, which in turn causes the acid levels in your urine to increase. Acidic urine increases the risk of kidney stones. Following your diabetes care plan closely in order to control blood glucose and drinking plenty of water every day can help to reduce the risk.

When should you see a urologist for kidney stones?

See a urologist as soon as possible if you have symptoms of a kidney stone. These include nausea, vomiting, back pain, abdominal pain, and blood in the urine. If your stone is small, you may be able to pass it by increasing your water intake and using over-the-counter pain medicines. For large stones, your urologist may recommend procedures to break up the stone or surgical removal.

Urology Associates, P.C. provides treatment for a wide range of conditions, from UITs to kidney stones and bladder cancer. If you think you could have a kidney stone in Nashville, make an appointment by calling (855) 901-1338.


Spotlight on the Symptoms of Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer is relatively uncommon, so men are often unaware of the symptoms. Unlike many kinds of cancer, about half of all cases of testicular cancer occur in young men between the ages of 20 and 34, though it can affect men at any stage in their lives, including in infancy. Typically, testicular cancer can be cured in its early stages, so it’s important to see a urologist if you think you could be experiencing any of these testicular cancer symptoms.

Painless Lump

The most common indicator of testicular cancer is the appearance of a painless lump on a testicle. Occasionally, the lump may become tender or painful, but in the vast majority of cases, it is not. When you do experience pain with testicular cancer, it is more likely to be in the lower belly or in the entire scrotum rather than just at the site of the lump. It is often described as a deep ache or a feeling of heaviness.

Testicular Swelling

Some men with testicular cancer notice that one of their testicles has become larger or swollen. Although it’s natural for men to have testicles that are different sizes, with testicular cancer, an existing difference in size may become more pronounced. This can happen with or without the presence of a lump.

Breast Growth

Testicular cancer can lead to a hormonal imbalance that causes breast growth or tenderness in men. These hormonal changes can also result in a loss of sex drive. Pre-pubescent boys who develop testicular cancer may experience more pronounced hormonal symptoms, including the sudden deepening of the voice or facial hair growth.

The symptoms of testicular cancer can also be associated with a number of other conditions, so let a urologist at Urology Associates, P.C. make an accurate diagnosis, so you can get the appropriate treatment. For a diagnosis and testicular cancer treatment in Nashville, call (855) 901-1338.


What You Need to Know About Circumcision in Adulthood

Circumcision, a procedure in which the foreskin of the penis is removed, is performed on about 65% of newborn boys in the U.S. Although circumcision is embraced for religious or cultural reasons, it is not medically necessary. Neither systemic nor sexual health is compromised by forgoing circumcision in the majority of cases, as long as proper hygiene practices are followed.

However, some uncircumcised men reach adulthood and decide that they would prefer to be circumcised. Generally, urologists recommend against having a circumcision performed during adulthood, unless there is a health problem. Some men have difficulty with recurring infections despite practicing good hygiene. Other men have difficulties with foreskin retraction. In these cases, a urologist can perform circumcision surgery to reverse the issues.

To discuss your options for circumcision in adulthood, schedule a consultation at Urology Associates, P.C. To make an appointment with a urologist in Nashville, please call (855) 901-1338.


Defining Lithotripsy

Not every medical procedure involves surgical incisions. Lithotripsy is a high-tech way to break up kidney stones. Your urologist may recommend lithotripsy if you have stones that are too large to pass, or if you have an anatomical abnormality that will make it difficult to pass the stones. Although electro-shockwave lithotripsy is not surgery, you will be placed under general anesthesia for the procedure.

Once you’re asleep, your urologist will use specialized equipment to direct high-energy shock waves through your body. These shock waves break up the stones into very tiny pieces. These pieces could be as small as a grain of sand. The entire treatment typically takes less than an hour. After the procedure, you’ll be advised to drink plenty of water to help the tiny bits flush out of your body with your urine. Lithotripsy is generally safe, but there are inherent risks with every medical procedure. Talk to your doctor about these risks before deciding whether to have lithotripsy.

Lithotripsy is one of the many advanced treatments we offer here at Urology Associates, P.C. If you’ve been told you may have kidney stones and you live in Middle Tennessee, give us a call at (615) 250-9200 to request our next available appointment.


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